Teak cockpit and side decks

Go to the Manuals for this modification
No Man.
5Modifications5
3Prev Next4
Teak deck construction Here one can see the teak decks laid out on a Sun Odyssey. The milled holes in the deck for marrying the hull and deck are also clearly visible, spaced every 10cm. Since the curves on a deck are composite, the teak decks are screwed into the decks and glued in place. Once the adhesive has dried, the screws are removed, the holes filled with epoxy, and the little round teak plugs inserted to hide the holes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Teak deck construction
Jeanneau teak decks I had heretore assumed that the teak decks are hand-laid onto the boats but was shown that the teak actually comes pre-made (from a German supplier) and then glued in place onto the decks. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau teak decks
Jeanneau teak decks Here one can see the almost finished product of the teak decks on a Sun Odyssey. Since the curves on a deck are composite, the teak decks are screwed into the decks and glued in place. Once the adhesive has dried, the screws are removed, the holes filled with epoxy, and the little round teak plugs inserted to hide the holes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau teak decks
Jeanneau 50DS teak A factory worker putting the finishing touches on the installed teak decks on this Jeanneau 50DS, hull 224. Despite using sheets of teak instead of single strips, there is still a lot of manual labour and effort involved in making a pretty (and seaworthy) teak deck. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau 50DS teak
J57 in the swimming pool A Jeanneau 57 soaking in the indoor swimming pool for the float test. The pool had to be elongated at the front end in order to let this new model fit into it. Not only is the hull integrity checked at this station, but the sides are sprayed with water to make sure that the windows don't leak and the engine get a test run. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 in the swimming pool
Hull 68 - Decks The topsides and decks of the future Zanshin while still at the Les Herbiers factory. I do like the teak rubbingstrake and hope that it will keep the hull from being scratched too badly during my docking attempts. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Decks

There is considerable debate in the boating world regarding teak decks. The detractors note that it adds a not insignificant amount of weight far above the waterline, costs a fortune, requires maintenance and that the thousands of screws used to attach the boards will cause leaks into the cored decks. All but the last point is true -- with the use of efficient modern adhesives there is no longer a need to use screws, on Zanshin the small teak plugs that one can see on the decks were used to hold the teak to the deck while the glue cured, then the screws are removed and the holes filled with epoxy and then plugged. The protractors of teak decks (to whom I obviously belong, since I ordered this option) say that it looks nice, grips well under all weather conditions and insulates the cabin area from temperature changes and noise.

On Zanshin I the only maintenance work I did on the teak was an annual cleaning with a mild acid solution (oxalic acid) after the hurricane season storage and then I would make it part of my daily ritual before happy hour to wash the decks with buckets of salt water. That was it - no chemicals, paints, sealants, oils or anything of the like. Just water, an occasional light brushing across the grain, and more water. On Zanshin the task is even easier despite the large areas of teak since I've got a wash down pump selectable between freshwater for the anchor chain and saltwater for the decks and I don't have to throw a bucket attached to a line overboard in order to haul up water.

What did surprise me during the factory tour was that the teak decks are not laid down board-by-board and then sealed with black caulking. As can be seen in the pictures on this page, the teak decks come preconstructed (manufactured by a German company) and are cut into shape prior to being screwed in and glued to the decks. It does make sense considering how much manual labour would be involved if it were all done by hand. The bottom right picture also shows the wooden rubstrake running along the topsides - I hope that this little buffer zone will keep the paint from being scratched while I learn how to handle this large and heavy yacht.

597 views since 2017-02-04, page last modified on 2017-04-18.