Electric toilet

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Toilets, called heads in nautical parlance, are not a popular subject aboard boats. They are a bit more complicated to use than their counterparts on land; a single lever to flush doesn't cut it on boats. First of all, heads need to be dry when sailing, since sailboats have a tendency to heel when under sail having the bowl full of water (no matter how clean it might seem) is not a good idea. So the toilet process on a boat consists of three steps - filling the bowl with water, flushing, draining the bowl. Most boats use manual heads which have a two-way lever (wet,dry) and a manual pump. So first one needs to put the lever to “wet” then fills the bowl using the pump. Then one does one's business and flips the lever to “dry” and pumps to remove the contents, flipping the lever and pumping the bowl full again and repeating the dry process to make sure that the fluid in the tubes and pipes is fresh sea-water (otherwise the head begins to smell badly very quickly indeed). This whole process takes time and energy (a good upper-body workout for the shoulder muscles). It is certainly a process that takes some getting used to - particularly if the boat is moving and rolling!
The electric heads function along similar lines, but now the electric switch and pump takes over the pumping and macerating! Yippee!
Zanshin has 3 heads aboard and I opted to make one of them a classic design manual head. This in case the electrical system fail for some reason and the two other heads become inoperative. I am reminded of an Oyster yacht on the ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers) several years ago which had been refitted for around £1 million but whose electrical system failed halfway across the Atlantic and they had no manual toilet and were reduced to using the “bucket and chuck it” method.

Electric forward head on Zanshin 2 of 3 heads aboard Zanshin are electric while the last one, the backup, is of standard manual design and is operated by a hand pump rather than an electric motor and macerator. All of the heads have holding tanks.
(2014-02-17 11:09:43 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/3.5, 1/80s] ISO 500)
Electric forward head on Zanshin
Manual head on Zanshin 2 of 3 heads aboard Zanshin are electric while the last one, the backup, is of standard manual design and is operated by a hand pump rather than an electric motor and macerator. All of the heads have holding tanks.
(2014-02-17 11:10:55 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/3.8, 1/100s] ISO 500)
Manual head on Zanshin
Electric toilet controls 2 of 3 heads aboard Zanshin are electric while the last one, the backup, is of standard manual design and is operated by a hand pump rather than an electric motor and macerator. All of the heads have holding tanks.
(2014-02-17 11:09:56 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/4.0, 1/60s] ISO 500)
Electric toilet controls
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