Either I'm getting more accustomed to the rhythmic thumping of the bass speakers or last night's music was more sedate than usual, since it wasn't as loud as the week before by a long shot. In addition to the lower decibel level they managed to shut down at around 2AM rather than a couple of hours later!
There had been a call on the VHF network yesterday regarding assisting in getting a boat visitor with a back problem (sciatic nerve) into a dinghy and ashore and I'd offered my assistance. So shortly before 10:00 I dinghied outside the bridge and found the boat, Double Down (a Leopard 45') Jeri and Neil aboard plus the patient, Sharon. Shortly thereafter Ann and Edwin from Windswept Dreams also arrived and with such a large crew it was a simple matter of transferring Sharon onto the dinghy and from there to the dock at the SMYC. Our group had breakfast ashore and we parted ways, with Sharon heading to her flight back home.
Since the dodger solar panel installation went relatively well I marked the bimini with blue masking tape for the remaining 2 Solbian panels. During a relative lull in the trade winds I proceeded to take down the bimini in preparation for bringing it to the sail makers on Monday morning. I certainly hope that they will be able to do the work quickly so that I can escape the confines of the Simpson Bay lagoon as quickly as possible.
For dinner I joined Mark, who had just returned from St. Barths and the famous “Bucket” Regatta at Lee's Roadside Grill.

Neil on Double Down Neil preparing the dinghy on Double Down to transport the injured Sharon ashore and to her return flight home.
(2015-03-22 10:12:08 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/3.5, 1/5000s] ISO 200)
Neil on Double Down
Double Down transport Jeri and Neil (and guardian dog) transporting Sharon, who had a sciatic condition, to the SMYC docks
(2015-03-22 10:20:03 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/4.2, 1/1250s] ISO 200)
Double Down transport
Bimini being marked for solar panels I've marked the locations where the flaps for the solar panel are to be installed.
(2015-03-22 15:39:58 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/18.0, 1/160s] ISO 200)
Bimini being marked for solar panels
Solbian Solar panel The last solar panel waiting for the bimini to be returned so that it can be installed.
(2015-03-22 16:46:09 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/18.0, 1/50s] ISO 200)
Solbian Solar panel
Biminiless Zanshin in St. Martin Zanshin looks very different with the bimini removed, this time not for storage but for having solar panel attachments sewn on at the sailmaker's
(2015-03-22 16:49:10 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/5.6, 1/400s] ISO 200)
Biminiless Zanshin in St. Martin
Bmini rolled up for transport The bimini, marked with masking tape where the flaps are to be placed, rolled up in preparation to go to the sailmakers
(2015-03-22 16:46:17 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/5.6, 1/500s] ISO 200)
Bmini rolled up for transport
Zanshin in Simpson Bay without a bimini The bimini has been removed to have solar panel attachments sewn in and she looks very different while at anchor in the Lagoon on St. Martin
(2015-03-22 16:49:02 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/5.6, 1/1000s] ISO 200)
Zanshin in Simpson Bay without a bimini
SMYC Sunset view The setting sun illuminating clouds over St. Martin as seen from the veranda at the SMYC
(2015-03-22 18:05:52 NIKON D7100 with a "18.0-250.0 mm f/3.5-6.3" lens. [f/5.6, 1/800s] ISO 200)
SMYC Sunset view
97 views since 2017-02-04, page last modified on 2017-02-04.