After the big and heavy meal of the previous evening coupled with a bit of liquor, I had a deep sleep and awoke early. I made a nice Lungo sized Nespresso coffee, climbed up into the cockpit to imbibe it and began the laborious process of deciding what to do. It is so easy, when in a paradisiacal location, to become complacent and just let the days slide by one by one and I had to give myself a mental pinch to get out of the cycle - so I started getting the boat ready for travel and was soon ready to go; although I wasn't quite sure where I wanted to go. After firing up the engine and letting it warm up I decided to dive “The Tugboat” at Île Tintamarre and then see if I was going to spend the night at a mooring ball there or perhaps continue in the direction of St. Barths.
As there was no wind at all I motored at 1500RPM and approximately 6 knot to the anchorage of Tintamarre. There were several mooring balls available when I arrived, but a day-trip catamaran had disgorged swimmers who were blocking easy access to all but one ball. I'd forgotten that the French system, unlike the BVI one, doesn't have longer pennants and one needs to take care in getting the moorings as they have very little "give". It turned out that with 0 swell and 0 wind picking a up the mooring ball was quite easy and soon after getting tethered I had the dinghy garage open and was preparing the diving equipment and loading it into the dinghy. The last part was the camera assembly and putting on the wet suit. I'd cut my toenails and learned my lesson to not leave any sharp edges as they catch in the wet suit when attempting to don it!
The water was as clear as I'd ever experienced there and despite the cloud cover and impending rain I knew that the dive would not only be fun but would also deliver some nice pictures, assuming that I hadn't messed up the camera settings again. I enjoyed the solitude of the dive along with the wonderfully calm and clear waters and upon returning to the boat spent an hour uploading and culling the 120 pictures I took down to a more manageable number of photos for this daily web blog page.
After that work I decided to head off to Île Fourchue so that I could do a morning dive and then continue on to St. Barths in time to clear in at Gustavia on Saturday before the Capitainerie closes for the weekend. There was little wind so I motored at 1500RPM again, and about halfway the wind picked up a little so I put out the genoa in order to pick up another half knot of groundspeed for the 10 mile trip. At Île Fourchue all the mooring balls were taken so I anchored in about 25 feet of water with 100 feet of chain - which should be sufficient considering the expected weather has light winds (0 - 5 knots, maximum).
I showered before lighting the BBQ for the Chorizo sausages that I'd thawed out during the crossing from Île Tintamarre; this turned out to have been a mistake, as I had problems lighting the flame and when the BBQ finally fired up it also took my eyebrows with it and the smell of burned hair is noxious, so I had another opportunity to shower before eating dinner in the cockpit.

Departing Grand Case The flat water and lack of wind mean that I have to motor in order to leave Grand Case behind me.
[18°7'3.17"N 63°3'30.66"W (facing S)]
Departing Grand Case
Octopus Diving speeding to work One of the dive boats heading from Creole Rock to Turtle Reef for the second dive of the day.
[18°6'30.57"N 63°3'35.07"W (facing E)]
Octopus Diving speeding to work
Creole Rock in Grand Case This rocky outcropping is barren over the surface, but makes a wonderful dive site underwater.
[18°7'7.6"N 63°3'24.79"W (facing S)]
Creole Rock in Grand Case
Grand Case behind Creole Rock The shoreline of Grand Case visible between the rocks of Creole Rock.
[18°7'7.7"N 63°3'21.63"W (facing S)]
Grand Case behind Creole Rock
St. Barths Ferry and Anguilla The St. Barths Ferry on an unaccustomed smooth ride, I've heard the nickname for it is "St. Barfs Ferry" due to the high speed and generally rough seas. The marker that the bird is sitting on is a Nature Reserve marker, this one is off Creole Rock.
[18°7'2.05"N 63°3'28.51"W (facing N)]
St. Barths Ferry and Anguilla
Flat seas at Anguilla Motoring out of Grand Case I was amazed at the incredibly calm seas between St. Martin and Anguilla, I'd never seen such flat waters here.
[18°6'21.1"N 63°3'29.2"W (facing NW)]
Flat seas at Anguilla
Tugboat Pilothouse The pilothouse seen while descending along the mooring line.
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Tugboat Pilothouse
Pilothouse of the Tugboat Pilothouse of the Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Pilothouse of the Tugboat
Fish sanctuary in the pilothouse The pilothouse of The Tugboat houses numerous schools of fish that use the shade and protection to ... hang about.
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Fish sanctuary in the pilothouse
Various snappers Various snappers
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Various snappers
Inverted Spanish Hogfish A upside-down hogfish swimming under the pilothouse roof.
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Inverted Spanish Hogfish
School of Snappers School of Snappers
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
School of Snappers
Tugboat porthole Tugboat porthole
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Tugboat porthole
Looking out from inside Looking out from inside
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Looking out from inside
Snappers in the tugboat shade Snappers in the tugboat shade
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Snappers in the tugboat shade
Starboard side of The Tugboat Starboard side of The Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Starboard side of The Tugboat
Snappers inside The Tugboat Snappers inside The Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Snappers inside The Tugboat
Tugboat port bow Tugboat port bow
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Tugboat port bow
The port aft section of The Tugboat The port aft section of The Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
The port aft section of The Tugboat
Fishlife in the Pilothouse of The Tugboat Fishlife in the Pilothouse of The Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Fishlife in the Pilothouse of The Tugboat
African Pompanos circling above The Tugboat African Pompanos circling above The Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
African Pompanos circling above The Tugboat
Starboard side freeboard growth Starboard side freeboard growth
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Starboard side freeboard growth
Spotted Goatfish A spotted Goatfish lying on The Tugboat deck.
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Spotted Goatfish
The Tugboat foredeck ruins The Tugboat foredeck ruins
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
The Tugboat foredeck ruins
The watch is still set to meters, I learned using imperial units so I'll switch back.
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Tugboat pilothouse trapped air The air bubbles from divers venturing inside the pilothouse are trapped and only leak out slowly through small fissures in the corroding superstructure.
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Tugboat pilothouse trapped air
Ascending from The Tugboat Ascending from The Tugboat
[18°7'27.25"N 62°59'5.22"W ]
Ascending from The Tugboat
Cleaning the camera gear The camera has been removed and I'm cleaning the Ikelite dive housing after my dive at The Tugboat off Ile Tintamarre in St. Martin
[18°7'2.19"N 62°59'17.99"W ]
Cleaning the camera gear
Dive gear cleaning and drying Cleaning and drying the dive gear aboard Zanshin.
[18°7'2.19"N 62°59'17.99"W ]
Dive gear cleaning and drying
Motoring calm seas Motoring from Tintamarre to Fourchue in calm seas and no wind with some dark rainclouds in the background hanging over Anguilla.
[18°7'20.6"N 63°2'57.49"W (facing SW)]
Motoring calm seas
Threatening rainclouds over St. Martin Taken looking back towards St. Martin en route to Ile Tintamarre, the clouds are getting darker and darker but luckily my passage had no squalls.
[18°5'35.94"N 62°59'12.66"W (facing W)]
Threatening rainclouds over St. Martin
Approaching distant St. Barths Motoring from St. Martin's Ile Tintamarre to St. Barths Ile Fourchue in calm seas, the wind picked up in the latter half and I used the Genoa to get a half-knot of help.
(2013-03-08 16:43:36 NIKON D7000 with a "35.0 mm f/1.8" lens. [f/5.6, 1/160s] ISO 100 Focus ∞)
Approaching distant St. Barths
Espresso for the passage An espresso as rations for the 10 mile journey under engine (due to the lack of wind and waves) between Ile Tintamarre and Ile Fourchue
(2013-03-08 16:42:02 NIKON D7000 with a "35.0 mm f/1.8" lens. [f/5.6, 1/25s] ISO 100 Focus 0.63m)
Espresso for the passage
Roche Plate off St. Barths Motoring past Roche Plate in calm seas, usually this makes for a cool photo opportunity with big waves splashing against this forlorn and lonely rocky islet.
[17°58'30.06"N 62°55'22"W (facing SW)]
Roche Plate off St. Barths
Heading to Ile Fourchue Here my speed is 6.4 instead of the previous 6.0 because I'd put out the genoa to let the light wind from the east speed up the boat a bit.
(2013-03-08 17:40:20 NIKON D7000 with a "35.0 mm f/1.8" lens. [f/1.8, 1/160s] ISO 100 Focus 0.60m)
Heading to Ile Fourchue
Sunset from Ile Fourchue The sun setting over one of the rocky islets seen from my anchorage position at Ile Fourchue off St. Barths
[17°57'21.21"N 62°54'20.97"W (facing W)]
Sunset from Ile Fourchue
396 views since 2017-02-04, page last modified on 2017-02-04.