I finally managed to weigh anchor at about 11am after going ashore for some desperately needed groceries (milk for coffee, limes & Carib beer, and baguettes & butter) and then motored to Île Tintamarre. I put the dive gear together and went to the wreck of the tugboat, taking 180 pictures with some really cool worms (nudibranches, perhaps... I'll have to check that out) and finally got the local pufferfish interested in taking a closer look at the lens. Up top after the dive I was really disappointed to see that each and every picture that I took was underexposed to an extent that even the magic of PhotoShop had no chance. <sigh> It turns out that I'd turn the dial on the flash from TTL (Through The Lens) to a normal fixed flash setting. I had planned on sailing to Île Fourchue for the night but opted to take a second dive to see if I could get some of those pictures again and afterwards it was already 17:30 so I decided to stay put for the night. After a steak dinner with garlic bread I sat on the deck for a while looking at the stars until I nodded off and returned to the cabin for the evening.

Dive gear in the dinghy My dive gear and camera in the dinghy prior to diving on the Tugboat wreck at Ile Tintamarre in St. Martin.
[18°7'1.99"N 62°59'19.92"W ]
Dive gear in the dinghy
Sea flora up close Sea flora up close
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Sea flora up close
Porcupinefish behind the wreck Again the porcupinefish eluded me by staying on the opposite side of the wreck.
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Porcupinefish behind the wreck
Pufferfish Pufferfish
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Pufferfish
Cleaning Goby in coral A cleaning goby nestled in the coral.
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Cleaning Goby in coral
Tugboat wreck pilothouse The pilothouse of the tugboat wreck provides shelter for numerous fish. I had gone inside for some pictures and the bubbles are from me.
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Tugboat wreck pilothouse
Cocoa Damselfish Cocoa Damselfish
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Cocoa Damselfish
Juvenile Cocoa Damselfish Juvenile Cocoa Damselfish
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Juvenile Cocoa Damselfish
Queen Angelfish A Queen Angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris [Pomacanthidae])
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Queen Angelfish
Spotted Goatfish Spotted Goatfish
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Spotted Goatfish
Sand Diver swimming Usually I only see them resting or buried on the bottom, but this one slowly swam by me and I had to get a photo of it in "flight".
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Sand Diver swimming
Tugboat wreck supports Tugboat wreck supports
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Tugboat wreck supports
Spotted Goatfish resting Spotted Goatfish resting
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Spotted Goatfish resting
Small fry in the pilothouse These small fish made the shade and shelter of the tugboat pilothouse their home.
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Small fry in the pilothouse
Spotted Moray in the wreck A spotted Moray eel in the tugboat wreck.
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Spotted Moray in the wreck
Red Hind poking out of a hole This Red Hind remained in a hole and looked out at me from its sheltered position.
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Red Hind poking out of a hole
Spanish Hogfish in the wreck Spanish Hogfish in the wreck
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Spanish Hogfish in the wreck
Porgy and school of yellowstripe Porgy and school of yellowstripe
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Porgy and school of yellowstripe
Decks of the tugboat wreck Decks of the tugboat wreck
[18°7'26.51"N 62°59'10.49"W ]
Decks of the tugboat wreck
Stad Amsterdam silhouette The Stad Amsterdam arrived (under motor) while I was at the anchorage but offerred this nice view as the sun was setting behind St. Martin.
[18°7'1.33"N 62°59'20.54"W (facing W)]
Stad Amsterdam silhouette
83 views since 2017-02-05, page last modified on 2017-02-04.