The wind was howling through the anchorage this morning, so powerful in gusts that I was debating taking down my bimini so that it wouldn't take damage. While clouds whipped by and rain threatened to pour down I revised my plans to spend the day and night at Tintamarre and opted to stay put and give the Île Créole another try today.
It is now shortly before 15:00 and the sun is out and the winds settled down and I could have given Île Tintamarre a try after all. Oh well, I had one dive and am going to use the same tank for the second one as it really isn't very deep and this time I am going to choose some formation and sit still until I get some good shots.
Although nothing outward seemed to have changed since the earlier dive, the visibility was terrible and I didn't bet too many new photos or see anything interesting on the second go around - but I did get to practice bouyancy control and did a bit of work on my patience in waiting for subjects to approach me.
Back aboard the boat was rocking around in the swell quite a bit so I didn't get to complete the tasks I'd set out to do and ended up going ashore for a small dinner and walking about on Terra Firma before retiring for the evening aboard the boat.

Schooling bluestriped Grunts A school of bluestriped grunts seen against the rocks
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Schooling bluestriped Grunts
Yellowhead Wrasse A small yellowhead Wrasse hiding amongst the reef rocks.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Yellowhead Wrasse
Nassau Grouper A rare Nassau Grouper hiding on the bottom close to Ile Creole in St. Martin.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Nassau Grouper
Peacock Flounder This peacock flounder was difficult to see until it moved and then it's coloration didn't match the new location until after I'd taken the photo.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Peacock Flounder
Smooth Trunkfish A shy smooth trunkfish that stayed just long enough to get photographed before heading off to quieter areas.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Smooth Trunkfish
A pair of foureyed Butterflyfish These two kept on splitting up to make this group shot a difficult one to get but it paid off in the end.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
A pair of foureyed Butterflyfish
Gray Angelfish I think that this was the same one I'd photographed before as they tend to be territorial, but the photo turned out nice so I kept it (again).
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Gray Angelfish
Sand Diver waiting This Sand Diver was just waiting for me to go away
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Sand Diver waiting
Juvenile slippery Dick A juvenile slippery Dick protected his (or her) territory from me.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Juvenile slippery Dick
Juvenile Bluehead Juvenile Bluehead
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Juvenile Bluehead
Juvenile Bluehead Juvenile Bluehead
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Juvenile Bluehead
Blue Tang Blue Tang
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Blue Tang
Squirrelfish Squirrelfish
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Squirrelfish
Cleaning Gobies on coral These cleaning Gobies are waiting for customers on this coral head.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Cleaning Gobies on coral
Parrotfish snoring? This parrotfish was hiding underneath a rocky outcropping and being cleaned by shrimp, but from this angle it really does look like it is snoring away underwater.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Parrotfish snoring?
Cleaning shrimp on parrotfish This is one of the shrimp I saw working on the parrotfish which is hiding underneath the rock in the background.
[18°7'2.95"N 63°3'23.56"W ]
Cleaning shrimp on parrotfish
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