Friday, February 25, 2011

While the boat was hit by waves this past night, they were coming directly from the front and the winds kept the boat pointed into the weather, with the additional bonus of charging the batteries via the wind generator; thus it was quite a comfortable night at, unlike for those at the dock where the wind kept the boats bouncing and jostling around. I can see the masts of the boats at docking swinging around now - even those in catamarans!.

I fought my way against a tough exit from the North Sound but then turned downwind and had a great run to Trellis Bay with the equivalent of about 5 reefs in the sails and still made 6 knots in winds that were constantly around 25 knots. It was a fun run despite being rolled around a bit in the big swell and being constantly worried about the dinghy getting pooped by a breaking following wave.
I'd flaked 2 lines, one on each side, and prepared the boat hook for use and was ready to pick up a mooring but knew that the mooring balls were spaced quite closely at Trellis and that the wind would make it difficult to pick up a ball and that a missed approach would be dicey as there isn't much room to manoeuvre. I found a mooring ball close to the entrance of Trellis and then the fun began - the first run was exploratory, I wanted to check the painter and visible parts of the mooring for damage. The one I'd chosen was in acceptable condition so my second run was in earnest and I set it up quite well and thought I'd finessed it quite nicely until I walked forward and the painter was just a yard or so out of my reach - I'd gotten the mooring directly in line, just a bit short. The wind whipped Zanshin I's bow around and I made a third pass which, while not as elegant and smooth as the previous one, managed to let me snatch the painter and get Zanshin I firmly attached.
I did a bit of work in the cockpit and below decks but spent my time waiting for a visitor or a call which never came, then had an early dinner at De Loose Mongoose and retired back to the boat in order to watch another movie and read the rest of my thriller.

Towing a dinghy In strong seas and while going fast the dinghy often gets to surfing, then a following wave can push it either sideway or nose-down and risk it getting swamped, which is why the dinghy is always taken on deck and tied down when going on a passage.
Towing a dinghy
Reefed sails on passage The mainsail is in the 3rd reef (the last blue dot on the sail can just be seen where the sail enters the mast) and I've got even more than 3 reefs on the genoa. I might not be getting the last 1/2 knot of speed from the boat and conditions, but I'm barely heeled over and the boat is in perfect control. Since I'm not racing I prefer comfort over speed.
Reefed sails on passage
Pounding in rough water This smaller French boat was pounding very heavily while motoring upwind in order to get the North Sound on Virgin Gorda in the BVI. I was having a better time of it, sailing downwind towards the main island of Tortola.
[18°28'30.47"N 64°26'39.93"W (facing NW)]
Pounding in rough water
Rough waters This smaller French boat was pounding very heavily while motoring upwind in order to get the North Sound on Virgin Gorda in the BVI. I was having a better time of it, sailing downwind towards the main island of Tortola.
[18°28'30.47"N 64°26'39.93"W (facing NW)]
Rough waters
William Tai William Tai
William Tai
Loose Mongoose at night Trellis bay and the Last Resort seen at night from my table at the Loose Mongoose bar and restaurant.
[18°26'40.41"N 64°31'59.15"W (facing NE)]
Loose Mongoose at night
Loose Mongoose entrance Loose Mongoose entrance
[18°26'40.28"N 64°31'59.29"W (facing SW)]
Loose Mongoose entrance
Trellis at night Trellis at night
[18°26'40.03"N 64°31'59.14"W (facing NE)]
Trellis at night

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