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A visit to Nantes and a grand tour of the Jeanneau factory in Les Herbiers.

Hull Numero 68, soon ZanshinThe new Zanshin, still just "Hull Numèro 68" in the factory in the last stages of construction prior to being shipped to the USA and then used at the Annapolis Boat Show in October. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
(2011-07-04 09:39:41 NIKON D7000 with a "18.0-200.0 mm f/3.5-5.6" lens. [f/4.8, 1/100s] ISO 400 Focus 2.00m)
Hull Numero 68, soon Zanshin
Hull 68 - fine entryLooking up at the hull of the future Zanshin I at the Jeanneau factory in Les Herbiers. By the time I will see this hull again her color will have been changed to "Champagne". This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - fine entry

I'd always wanted to take a look at the Jeanneau production process, which I'd heard was by far the most automated and large operation in the business, and I got the chance to go on July 4th, 2011 (which, not surprisingly, is not a holiday in France). That week Jeanneau was holding an international distributor meeting and therefore Chris Bent of BAY Yacht Agency was there and we had arranged that he would accompany me on a tour of the facilities while the Jeanneau 57 yacht that I had on order was in the final stages of construction / manufacture / fitting out.
While I've been to France many times, at one time I worked in the Alpes-Maritimes region, I'd never been to west of Paris before so I decided to spend the weekend in Nantes and play tourist. Thus I departed Germany on Saturday afternoon so that I would get to Nantes in time for a timely check-in at the hotel and chance to partake of the gustatory offerings on the Loire. Taking recent flight experiences into consideration, I was not particularly surprised at the delays on my flights from Frankfurt, Germany via Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris. But I still made it in time for some daylight exploration in the city center of Nantes.
Normally when I have a piece of paper with a hotel name and a street address and nothing else, I spend ages walking aimlessly around and trying not to look lost before working up the courage to ask for directions; I gather that I'm not alone in this rather irrational behaviour. But this time I took a bus to the center of town, then randomly chose a direction and soon found myself in the central square (well, circle, to be more precise) and the first exit street that I found happened to be the road on which my hotel was located! I was so surprised that I almost didn't believe my luck - my first thoughts were that “There must be 2 roads with the same name...”. I checked into the hotel and dropped off my things in the nice room, located right at the top floor and underneath the slate roof. This location was somewhat sub-optimal for summer conditions, though. I was worried that the room's superheated air might cause the linen and other combustibles to burst into flame but opening the two windows and departing before I got a stroke was what I ended up doing, and by the time I'd returned from my fine meal the ambient temperature in the room had settled from “Broil” to “Hot”.
Sunday was another sunny, warm and clear day and perfect for me to play tourist and finally let my camera see some shutter action. I'd noted some Jeanneau sailboats with flags close to the main train station on my bus ride the previous day, and also wanted to get an English paperback novel for the return flight. While I didn't realize it when I went to see the boats, they were expressly there for the dealer meeting and were top-secret-new-models-never-before-shown-in-public. After the book buying (I opted to try reading a Dan Brown thriller) I took a tour through the castle/fortification and walked all around town for several hours in order to work up an appetite for the evening meal, which I'd arranged with Chris. I'd not brought my cellular phone or notebook and the piece of paper with the time/location for dinner was safely stored back in Frankfurt, but I did wait in the room until around 8pm. I'd asked several times at the front desk whether Chris was in, but was told that he wasn't and opted to leave and get some food by myself - fortunately Chris, his wife, Eric (the proprietor of Bay Yacht Agency) and Douglass, his companion were at the front desk and asking for me. Just 50 yards away was La Cigale, our restaurant for the evening. After a great meal, we retired for the evening in preparation for the factory tour the next day.

Teak deck constructionHere one can see the teak decks laid out on a Sun Odyssey. The milled holes in the deck for marrying the hull and deck are also clearly visible, spaced every 10cm. Since the curves on a deck are composite, the teak decks are screwed into the decks and glued in place. Once the adhesive has dried, the screws are removed, the holes filled with epoxy, and the little round teak plugs inserted to hide the holes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Teak deck construction
The ladies didn't join Chris, Alex and Jeff (Jorgenson, from Jeanneau USA) to head off to Les Herbiers from Nantes the next morning. Fortunately we were headed out of town and the heavy inbound traffic didn't affect us at all. We arrived at the Jeanneau factory after just a short detour or two (despite on board GPS navigation) and, after an obligatory coffee, proceeded to begin our tour of the major halls in the factory. While I could use my camera in most places in the factory, the injection moulding hull construction hall and the milling machine were off limits to paparazzi such as myself
But on the upside, I was informed that the future Zanshin was hull Nº 68 and that it was in the final stages of production and we'd be visiting her towards the end of the tour.
The tour began in the hall where the hulls were laid up in the moulds and it was very impressive to see how they approached making the huge one-piece hull for the Jeanneau 57. The resin has a special chemical dye that reacts with the glass mats and thus makes it easy to see which parts of a layer might be resin starved. The individual glass mats are precut and numbered and I was surprised how small some of the individual pieces were, they were about the size of my hand. The mold for the Jeanneau 57 is a two-part one, as the shapes of the hull and the size of the hull make a one piece mold difficult if not impossible to construct. After that building we visited the big milling machine, which fills most of another hall. I'd worked with 3D milling machines before, but none even approaching the size of this behemoth - the whole deck of a Jeanneau 57 easily fit into the hall and the mill moved on tracks from above and would, with pinpoint accuracy, drill holes and mill out hatch and winch openings. All that in a matter of 2.5 hours for a whole Jeanneau 57; the savings compared to doing this manually are huge and no human can be that accurate and consistent. Again, no pictures were permitted in this area.

The production lines for the boats was the next stop on the tour and the Jeanneau 57 line was at the far left side of the building, with numerous other production lines for sailboats and powerboats going alongside in parallel. I didn't see how many stations the other lines had, but despite the length of the building there was space for only 3 stations for the Jeanneau 57 due to the size of the boat. The building itself was immaculate and I liked the touch of having enclosed cabins for each line for workers to rest - and smoke. The Jeanneau 57 production line started with a hull that was being filled with equipment underneath the floorboards and this allowed us to walk into the hull and get an idea of how massive and voluminous it really is and I was, and remain, duly impressed. The pictures below give a sense of scale but I'd recommend any future boat purchasers to get a factory tour (be it Jeanneau or another manufacturer) and to get a feel for the sizes, volumes and amount of effort involved in putting a sailboat together.
Two years earlier I'd flown to the U.K. boat show in Southampton and spent 2 days going through all the nooks and crannies on their demonstration boat, the pictures I took during that excursion can be seen here.

Frankfurt Airport departureLooking at the apron in front of Terminal 2 at Frankfurt before heading out on the bus to the Air France flight leading to Nantes via Paris. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
(2011-07-02 12:10:21 NIKON D7000 with a "18.0-200.0 mm f/3.5-5.6" lens. [f/8.0, 1/250s] ISO 400 Focus ∞)
Frankfurt Airport departure
Paris DelaysIt just doesn't seem fair that all the flights were on time except the one to Nantes, for which I had tickets. The board was kept up-to-date in that every 10 minutes the ETA would also change by 10 minutes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.After an hour the airline handed out vouchers for one cold or hot drink at the store upstairs.
(2011-07-02 15:47:24 NIKON D7000 with a "10.0-24.0 mm f/3.5-4.5" lens. [f/4.5, 1/160s] ISO 160 Focus 0.84m)
Paris Delays
Nantes AirportWaiting at the shuttle bus station for the ride into town. Although it had been a long trip with delays in Paris, I wasn't in a great hurry to get to the hotel and opted for a bus rather than a taxi. It was sunny and 27° outside so I just enjoyed the warmth. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°9'27.78"N 1°36'3.03"W (facing SW)]
Nantes Airport
Amateur Brass bandUpon arrival in Nantes, I headed for the city's central square and saw this amateur brass and percussion band playing. I think that the little girl's parents had given her money for the band's collection hat in order to get them to stop playing. At least they made up for their lack of synchronisation with exuberance and volume. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'51.66"N 1°33'29.9"W (facing SW)]
Amateur Brass band
Nantes Hotel de FranceJust as every city in the US has (at least one) "Main Street", it seems that every town in France has a Hotel de France, in while in Nantes I stayed in it. The view from my window was nice, but the black slate on the roof made for a rather warm room. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'48.21"N 1°33'42.64"W (facing SW)]
Nantes Hotel de France
Nantes churchNantes is an old fortified city along the Loire, dates back to 60 BC and has some wonderful architecture, churches and fortifications. This church in the centre of town. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'57.05"N 1°33'28.87"W (facing SE)]
Nantes church
Old and NewRemains of the old city wall in the middle of modern construction. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'54.65"N 1°33'28.86"W (facing N)]
Old and New
Rue Crebillon in NantesThe Rue Crebillon runs from my hotel down to the city square seen below. Luckily it is closed to general traffic and thus it is quieter in the hotel than I expected. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'48.13"N 1°33'42"W (facing NE)]
Rue Crebillon in Nantes
Nantes Jeanneau displayThe annual international dealer meeting for Jeanneau was going on while I was there and these sailboats and powerboats were in the water close to the main train station. I wasn't able to get closer than this to take pictures and didn't realize that these were the new models being presented to the dealers - I had assumed that it was a Jeanneau dealer in town. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'50.94"N 1°32'35.11"W (facing N)]
Nantes Jeanneau display
Nantes CastleThe Castle of the Dukes of Brittany, outer wall. this castle guarded the important shipping route of the Loire outside of Nantes and was the longtime home of the Dukes of Brittany. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°13'0.21"N 1°32'52.45"W (facing S)]
Nantes Castle
Inner castle buildingsThe Castle of the Dukes of Brittany, inside the austere stone battlements are the home of the Dukes of Brittany, where they resided from the 15th century to the 18th century. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'58.85"N 1°32'56.18"W (facing W)]
Inner castle buildings
Chateau NantesThe Castle of the Dukes of Brittany - looking down from the battlements into the inner moat. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'57.23"N 1°33'0.09"W (facing S)]
Chateau Nantes
Nantes Castle entranceThe Castle of the Dukes of Brittany entranceway. Note the smaller entrance for pedestrians on the right. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'58.75"N 1°33'0.33"W (facing E)]
Nantes Castle entrance
Mexican Fresco in NantesA temporary exhibit of a Mexican-themed fresco on a slanted wall in the middle of Nantes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'36.68"N 1°33'49.37"W ]
Mexican Fresco in Nantes
Cours CambronneThis promenade, constructed in 1791 and name after Pierre Cambrone, a famous General of the French Empire during the Napoleanic era. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'42.12"N 1°33'48.49"W (facing SW)]
Cours Cambronne
Passage Pommeraye, NantesThis well known shopping mall in Nantes, named after the property developer, has been around since 1840 and boasts a very ornate renaissance-style decor. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'48.41"N 1°33'34.35"W (facing W)]
Passage Pommeraye, Nantes
Dinner at La CigaleChris Bent, his wife, Eric and Douglass at dinner in Nantes. &qout;La Cigale" was just across the street from my hotel and offerred a splendid ambience and dinner for us all that night. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[47°12'45.7"N 1°33'43.71"W ]
Dinner at La Cigale
J57 Upper DeckAn unfinished deck for a Jeanneau 57 after going through the huge milling machine (which I wasn't allowed to photograph, unfortunately). This large machine takes a couple of hours to precisely drill and cutout all of the hull forms and shapes and holes - something that would have taken many more hours to do manually. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 Upper Deck
J57 Dinghy GarageThe dinghy garage on the Jeanneau 57 is formed as part of the deck of the boat and is thus considered to be ":outside" the hull. Here one can see how the shape and form of the dinghy garage area are formed by fiberlass molded upper deck. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 Dinghy Garage
J57  Deck moldThe deck seen from below, with access holes already precisely drilled by the huge milling machine and some of the electric conduit and cabling visible. The deck is a composite structure glued from top and bottom. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 Deck mold
J57 deck structureHere the joint between the upper (outer) and lower (inner) deck structure is visible. These are pressed and glued together and subsequently the whole deck assembly is bolted every 10cm and glued to the hull in order to form a solid bond for a seaworthy boat. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 deck structure
J57 deck after millingThe milled deck of a Jeanneau 57. The milling hall and machine are behind the closed door in the back; this huge machine precisely drills all the holes and cuts out the fiberglass deck openings in a matter of under 3 hours, an effort that would have taken over 80 hours if done manually. Unfortunately, I couldn't take a picture of the device in action on another deck, but it was certainly a sight to behold. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 deck after milling
Finished hulls waiting completionFinished hulls waiting to be married to their corresponding decks outside one of the Jeannau production buildings in Les Herbiers. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Finished hulls waiting completion
Jeanneau hullA finished hull outside the layup building. Those barely visible little dots on the topsides mark blemishes from the mold and will be fixed by hand. Since a hull is manufactured from the outside in, with the outer gelcoat getting sprayed onto the form first, any dust or dirt in the mold will result in small blemishes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau hull
Jeanneau teak decksI had heretore assumed that the teak decks are hand-laid onto the boats but was shown that the teak actually comes pre-made (from a German supplier) and then glued in place onto the decks. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau teak decks
Jeanneau teak decksHere one can see the almost finished product of the teak decks on a Sun Odyssey. Since the curves on a deck are composite, the teak decks are screwed into the decks and glued in place. Once the adhesive has dried, the screws are removed, the holes filled with epoxy, and the little round teak plugs inserted to hide the holes. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau teak decks
Jeanneau 50DS teakA factory worker putting the finishing touches on the installed teak decks on this Jeanneau 50DS, hull 224. Despite using sheets of teak instead of single strips, there is still a lot of manual labour and effort involved in making a pretty (and seaworthy) teak deck. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau 50DS teak
J57 Hull - Stage IA Jeanneau 57 hull in the first of 3 stations in the production line. The hull is being filled underneath the (future) floorboards with systems and hardware. In the picture is Jeff Jorgensen of Jeanneau USA. The size and volume of the hull is impressive and I really got an appreciation of how much material and effort go into making a big boat. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 Hull - Stage I
J57 - Production Station IA Jeanneau 57 hull in the first station of 3 in the production halls in Les Herbiers. The little black things are wire-ties that will later be used to hold everything from wire conduits to plumbing in place so that it doesn't chafe. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 - Production Station I
Inside an empty J57 hullJeff, Eric, Chris and Dominique inside a Jeanneau 57 hull at the first station of the 3-stage production line for this yacht. The hull is still mostly empty but is being filled with those items beneath the floorboards before continuing on to the 2nd station where the cabinetry is installed. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Inside an empty J57 hull
J57 production piecesSome of the jigs and spacer items used in the first stage of the production process of the Jeanneau 57. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 production pieces
Jeanneau production lineLooking across the main production hall where several boat series are made in parallel. Each production line (going from right to left) has several stations. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau production line
J57 - Production Station IIThis Jeanneau 57 is at the second production stage, where the inner wooden joinery and cabinetry is inserted and completed. While we didn't have time to see the carpentry production building, I did see that the different sections were pre-made and then dropped in place before being secured. The computer-aided work in making the cabinetry allows for this modular approach as production tolerances are very small so that the pieces will always fit correctly. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 - Production Station II
J57 - Stage II, bulkheadsAt the second station in the production process, this Jeanneau 57 is getting the bulkheads installed as well as cabinetry in the main cabin installed. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 - Stage II, bulkheads
J57 - Stage II, forward cabinThe forward cabin on this Jeanneau 57 in the second of three stages of the production line process is taking shape. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 - Stage II, forward cabin
J57 production lineLooking down the production line for Jeanneau 57s from Station II. The woodwork on this model has already been partially completed. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 production line
J57 Production - Station IIIThis is the final station of the Jeanneau 57 production line at the factory in Les Herbiers. It is empty as it's occupant has left the building (it can be seen floating in the pool in another picture) and the next one down the line isn't finished yet. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 Production - Station III
J57 in the swimming poolA Jeanneau 57 soaking in the indoor swimming pool for the float test. The pool had to be elongated at the front end in order to let this new model fit into it. Not only is the hull integrity checked at this station, but the sides are sprayed with water to make sure that the windows don't leak and the engine get a test run. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
J57 in the swimming pool
Jeanneau 53 Champagne colorThis Jeanneau 53 in the final stages of construction has a champagne colored hull. I opted to get this color as well, but due to time constraints it will be put on in Annapolis and not at the factory but this picture give me an idea of how it will look once complete. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Jeanneau 53 Champagne color
Hull 68 - on DeckAboard the future Zanshin for the first time. This is the final production step where all of the remaining work is done. Within a couple of weeks of this picture being taken, she'll be aboard a freighter enroute to Annapolis. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - on Deck
Hull 68 - DecksThe future Zanshin at the final production step, where all remaining internal items are installed and fitted. Somehow sailboats just don't look right without a mast. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Decks
Hull 68 - GalleyThe future Zanshin's galley under construction. Here, at the last production step, the final fittings and other items are being installed prior to the yacht getting a shrink-wrap covering and heading off to the USA. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Galley
Hull 68 - EngineThe future Zanshin engine. Still all nice and new and shiny, plus note the two alternators (one for 12V and the other for 24V). This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Engine
Hull 68 - Builder's plateI'm not sure what happened to the other 6 hulls, but this is the official plate for the new Zanshin. I'm not sure about finding comfortable sleeping quarters for 13 crew members in "A" waters (offshore, ocean), but theoretically I could take that many along for the ride. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Builder's plate
Hull 68 - DecksThe topsides and decks of the future Zanshin while still at the Les Herbiers factory. I do like the teak rubbingstrake and hope that it will keep the hull from being scratched too badly during my docking attempts. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Decks
Hull 68 - KeelThe bottom of the future Zanshin before the keel is fitted. The extrusion is the sump area of the bilge and fits into a slot in the iron keel. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Keel
Hull 68 - BowthrusterThe fitted bowthruster on the future Zanshin. While there is a bottom fitting that fills out this bowthruster area, I have trouble believing that there are those intrepid individuals out there who would order a boat this size without a bowthruster. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - Bowthruster
Hull 68 - fine entryLooking up at the hull of the future Zanshin I at the Jeanneau factory in Les Herbiers. By the time I will see this hull again her color will have been changed to "Champagne". This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - fine entry
Hull 68 - bowEric and Jeff underneath the bow of the future Zanshin at the Jeanneau final production hall in Les Herbiers. One can see how the bottom of the bowthruster shaft is not a structural element but added on afterwards. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Hull 68 - bow
Finished Jeanneaus in a rowThe boats at the final station in the production process, lined up in a row. One can see that saildrives are prevalent in the newer boats produced. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.71"N 1°1'55.88"W ]
Finished Jeanneaus in a row
Jeanneau powerboat productionLooking down the production line for the power boats, which are being manufactured in the same production hall as the sailboats. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Jeanneau powerboat production
Hull 68 - Power panelOne of the power distribution and breaker panels on the future Zanshin at the factory during manufacture. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - Power panel
Hull 68 - settee and chainplateA quick snap of the chainplate and folding bar portion of the port settee on the future Zanshin taken during the factory tour in Les Herbiers. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - settee and chainplate
Hull 68 - Salon construction workConstruction work is still going on in the main cabin on the future Zanshin while she is in her final construction stages at the Jeanneau factory in Les Herbiers. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - Salon construction work
Hull 68 - Aft quarterThis picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - Aft quarter
Hull 68 - starboard steering stationInstruments and padded steering station on hull 68, soon to become Zanshin. This was taken at the Jeanneau factory in France during the final stages of construction. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - starboard steering station
Hull 68 - through hulls and platesThe bottom of Hull 68, soon to be called Zanshin, at the Jeanneau factory. Some of the (many) through-hulls and scoops and grounding/cooling plates can be seen in this picture. I have to admit that I don't know what they are all for - but I'll surely learn. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - through hulls and plates
Hull 68 - PropellerThis is a temporary folding propeller on Hull 68 (soon Zanshin) put on while in the final manufacturing stages at the Les Herbiers Jeanneau factory. At the time I took this picture I was planning on replacing this propeller with a Gori folding propeller. This picture is part of the story of the Jeanneau Factory Tour.
[46°51'52.61"N 1°1'55.8"W ]
Hull 68 - Propeller